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    Archive for the 'Maury Talkin’ Sports' Category

    Maury goes Editorial on you

    Media Accessibility Leads to Enlightenment

    22nd October 2011

    It’s not good to try and look in the mirror and size yourself up as a media member, unless of course your position is clearly defined. Peter Gammons, Peter King, John Clayton, Ken Rosenthal… “Insider”. If you blog from home and do analysis around stories in the mainstream and alternative media and provide commentary, clearly an “outsider”.

    There are tweeners. Liz Mullen of the SportsBusiness Journal/Daily is as inside as they get when it comes to what agents are up to, but outside, for the most part when it comes to leagues.

    And, then there’s me.

    I’m an “inside, outsider” in that I’m an independent. I have insider access to an extent, but I would never dream of saying that I have the muscle needed to get into every place I’d like to be because I don’t have “ESPN”, “FOX”, or “Yahoo! Sports” on my title at this point.

    You’re asking what this is all about. Keep reading….

    Much was made of how Albert Pujols and some of the veterans on the St. Louis Cardinals didn’t make themselves available to the media after the World Series Game 2 loss on Friday night. A host of columns, and a mountain tweets and Facebook comments were generated out of the actions, specifically with Pujols.

    This morning, Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com ran a story that may best describe why accessibility is critical to good reporting (see Stars need to talk to media, regardless). Part of the column reads:

     

    Anti-media types consider reporters to be pests. Fanboys want to hear only the best about their favorite players and teams. But the daily contact between reporters and players produces not just quotes, but also background information for context. And the checks and balances actually work both ways.

    […]

    Such accountability is healthy, often prompting restraint. Judging from Twitter, many fans took exception with the other side of the argument, that players should be accountable to reporters. Well, reporters essentially are conduits to fans, means to an end

    Rosenthal hits on something that has been a source for my desire to write daily: background information for context.

    From the time I began writing, I wanted to interview those around sports. I wanted to ask my questions, and get answers from individuals directly without the filter that may come from another writer’s perspective. It was done, not only to get original content out there, but to be enlightened.

    Rosenthal talks in his column about how those that are balanced pros as reporters can be heard to say, “I don’t know.” Even the best, with many, many years in the trenches have been heard to say that. And, the best advice I ever got about doing radio was when confronted with a question you might not know the answer to, the best of them know how to gracefully say, “I don’t know.”

    There can be pitfalls in accessibility. One can run the risk of being a conduit for one point of view or another. “Balance” has to be a reporters credo, even if a story is incredibly one-sided.

    Reporting on the business side of sports can be difficult. Report on a game, and the outcomes are fairly clear, and the story rarely lingers more than a few days. Contrast that with a story on labor issues, or the complexities around a club bankruptcy or sale, and the story can ebb and flow for months, if not years.

    I have been pounded every which way to Sunday on reporting a story one way, only to see the direction of events shift 180 degrees in a matter of days or weeks. That’s the nature of the beast.

    So, talking to those directly involved in negotiations is paramount to understanding how matters can change, the complexities and internal politics, and more.

    I have never considered myself an “expert” in the field of sports business. To say as much would mean knowing everything about an industry that is constantly moving and evolving. There are no rules. There is no “final out” or “time has expired”, it just moves on.

    So, in a world where fans take sides, and look for any little matter to say, “You’re a hypocrite,” if you want to be a journalist, get some real thick skin. If you’re good, you’re always learning, which if you think about it, isn’t a bad thing, right?

    FOLLOW MAURY BROWN ON TWITTER @BizballMaury

    Posted in Maury Talkin' Sports | Comments Off on Media Accessibility Leads to Enlightenment

    Confessions of an Independent Sports Writer

    17th June 2011

    This is not about sports. It is sports only insofar as it was the impetus to write. To provide information. And yes, in some sense, to stroke my ego.

    I have pushed and prodded. Wrote for nothing. Wrote for something. Wrote to report. I wrote for the truth. Wrote to entertain. Wrote to make my head spin.

    I did not begin writing to make money. I began writing as an outlet. A deep, and in some ways, sick need to get information, thoughts and feelings out of my head.

    I began it all as part of a civic effort. Take some analytics around my home market, look across the baseball landscape, and see if Portland, OR could support an MLB club one day.

    That was 2000. I worked with civic leaders and baseball boosters in what I call “the ultimate SABR research project” – a real, live effort with funding, press and politics.

    It was eye-opening. I had a mentor in David Kahn, who is currently the President of Basketball Operations for the Minnesota Timberwolves. “Learn to be dispassionate,” was the message. Getting an MLB was more than a long shot. “The process is the reward,” said Kahn.

    The process is the reward… I took that to heart.

    Portland didn’t land the Expos. It was wired for Washington, DC. That didn’t mean I stopped writing. The joy of pumping out article after article had meaning. Or, it had meaning to me and a niche of others looking for something on sports outside the lines.

    I was approached by The Hardball Times to write an essay for one of their annuals, and simply stuck around. I began understanding that there was a fraternity of great writers covering baseball. Whether it was Rob Neyer, Dave Studeman, Aaron Gleeman, Joe Sheehan, Will Carroll, Christina Kharl, Jayson Stark, Jerry Crasnick, or the late, great Doug Pappas and John Brattain…. more than I can mention in this space. I was jacked to be involved.

    When I went to Baseball Prospectus, there was a sense that I had, in some form or another, “arrived”. I don’t know why I wound up feeling disappointed after a period of time. Writing for BP was to be lined up with the best writers and minds around sabermetrics.

    Which is probably why wasn’t happy.

    I was clearly not going to be the most popular there. I mentioned that ego is a part of writing (for most), and this was the case.

    I called Will Carroll, someone that I knew that would be straight up with me. “This sounds stupid, and a bit pompous, but you’re not helping your brand,” said Carroll.

    Will knew I had seen myself as a niche in a niche. Writing about the business of sports was one thing. Writing about the business of baseball wasn’t going to allow the visibility I ultimately hoped for; I’d be a one-trick-pony. If I was going to see growth in “brand” then writing about just baseball was not going to cut it. It was always going to be the first love, but branching out made sense. In some senses, sports business is like art: when you step back and look at the whole, there is a point where each sport intersects and lends itself to the overall picture. I focused on The Biz of Baseball, launched three more sites, and knew I would somehow live and die by the Business of Sports Network.

    It’s here that I can’t help but look at the print and alternative outlets and see what is happening on both sides of the fence.

    For me, I began to think that in moving to BP, it was just a short hop to writing for one of the larger outlets for pay. In a short period, I’d be at ESPN, Yahoo! Sports, the SportsBusiness Journal… a serious paying gig. That became the focus.

    Ego had supplanted desire. In an industry stacked with writers, I (foolishly) thought I was good enough to climb into a contract position. I may be good enough, but only a fool would say that in an industry with more workers than positions that they’d come knocking. Do what you do because you like doing it.

    I am a product of blind luck. I had always had an interest in sports. But, I had early on taken an interest to sports outside the lines. When I began writing, few were plying their wares in that area.

    There are aggregators of news – those that scour the internet looking for sports stories, and blog traditionally about it. A couple of sentences here… a pulled paragraph from the source story there… some commentary. Done.

    I wish I were Craig Calcaterra, a rare breed of sports writer that has been able to be a superior columnist in every right. I, stupidly, have to want to break news, or provide data that others don’t.

    I feel for this former blogger from AOL (see AOL Hell: An AOL Content Slave Speaks Out). I never wanted to go to a large outlet strictly to pump out stories. Being independent (and often times, broke) was okay by me. I write for Forbes gratis and have never thought twice about it. It’s “Forbes”. It looks good on the resume. That’s allowed me to write for Variety as a freelancer — a bit of frosting on the cake.

    Finally, it’s about chops. Here I am prattling on for no other reason than to prattle. Write because you have a passion for it. In that, you will find there is never writer’s block. You push through, get the story out, and move on to the next story. Not everything you write will scream, “Pulitzer”. Everything you write should scream, “I’m a writer. This is what I do.”

    I’m an independent writer, and somehow have had the incredible graces to have accessibility… well, at least within Major League Baseball. The NFL despises me, but if a story is a story and the truth lies on one side far more than another, you can’t try and make an egg into a perfect sphere. Slamming hard on the opposite to be balanced will only get egg on your face.

    Writing to write is a joy. It costs nothing. It’s clearly cheaper than psychiatry.

    I hope to do a book one day. Something that will have me dig so deep into a subject that at the end of it, there will be the liberation that every rock has been looked under, and more ink was spilled on the topic than I could ever do in any other form than within a book. I hope to say that’s soon. Until then, I’m writing to write.

    FOLLOW MAURY BROWN ON TWITTER: @BizballMaury

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    Posted in Maury Talkin' Sports, Maury's World | 4 Comments »

    MLB All-Star Game, Forbes, and an Update on Bloomberg TV Sports Business Pilot

    6th June 2010

    All things considered, media has been good for me these days. Yes, I’m still looking for a full-time writing gig. Yes, I’d take a consulting or full-time position with a club or agency, but in the meantime, it’s nice to be wanted.

    In mid-May I accepted an invitation to write for Forbes’ SportsMoney (see my article archive). Being a contributor gets me in some extremely fine company. Besides  Forbes senior writers and editors Michael Ozanian , Kurt Badenhausen, Tom Van Riper, and Paul Maidment, there’s sports economist and author Andy Zimbalist; Lee Igel an assistant professor at New York University; Andrew Brandt, the former player agent and president of the Green Bay Packers who is now president of the National Football Post; Wayne McDonnell who is Clinical Associate Professor of Sports Management at New York University, and one who has offered frequent content to BizofBaseball.com, and; Kristi Dosh, an attorney, baseball blogger, and one working on a book on collective bargaining in MLB.  Like I said, good company.

    The Forbes work has been a nice add, and opens some doors, but the best news I’ve gotten in a long time is that I have been approved to cover the 2010 MLB All-Star Game in Anaheim this year. Getting your foot in the door for what is considered a “jewel event” by MLB is not easy for an independent new media writer, such as myself. While I have been freelancing for Yahoo Sports, The New York Post, Baseball America, and shortly, MSNBC, MLB approved BizofBaseball.com through their media affiliation program, a sign that they view the site as a legitimate news organization reporting in an “at large” capacity. Next stop? An attempt to get credentialed for the World Series. After that? Let’s see what happens at the Winter Meetings.

    Finally, I reported last month that I was part of a sports business pilot for Bloomberg Television. Well, that show has been shelved. I need to contact one of the producers, but word is that the content filmed last month might be interspersed throughout regular programming on Bloomberg Television. Hey, just getting in front of the camera is always a great learning experience. Recall doing my first piece for ESPN and I felt like Albert Brooks’ character Aaron Altman in Broadcast News when he had the sweat machine turn on. The Bloomberg filming felt easier, which shows I’m either getting more comfortable doing television, or I realize that Bob Costas and Dan Patrick really have nothing to worry about.


    OTHER NEWS FROM THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS NETWORK

    (THE BIZ OF BASEBALL)


    Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey, and is a contributor to Forbes. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

    Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

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    Posted in Baseball Insight, Maury Talkin' Sports, Maury's World | 3 Comments »

    Bloomberg Television, Sports Business, and Me

    24th April 2010

    BloombergFilming

    If there was ever a sign that sports business has moved out from “bookworm” to “family room”, it’s been the expansion of television programming dedicated to sports outside the lines. I big hat tip has to go to Darren Rovell, who, besides being the king of Gatorade history, has become a staple on CNBC for all things sports business. Others have followed Rovell, including Rick Horrow on CNN and FOX Sports.

    Bloomberg News has jumped in with both feet into the world of sports. Whether it has been Bloomberg Sports, or their analytics products for baseball (see Bloomberg Sports Making Push to Be Heavy Weight in Baseball Analytics), the financial giant has seen that sports off the field has dollar signs attached to it.

    I can now proudly say, I will be part of another Bloomberg foray into sports business.

    On Friday I filmed a segment for a Bloomberg Television pilot show on sports business. The show is tentatively set to air in mid-June. This is TV so while I spent 30 minutes answering questions from the producers, if I see 5 mins. of air time, it will be a miracle. Still, 5 or 2 or 10, any face time is good time.

    What did we discuss? MLB revenue-sharing, explaining the Luxury Tax, how Target Field benefits the Twins, whether a Red Sox/Yankees rivalry is good or bad for baseball, and early record low attendance for a few of the clubs… great stuff. I tip my hat to the producers who really did their homework.

    And, to add to the filming, Bloomberg will use data that has been researched for BizofBaseball.com, with proper citation through graphics or voiceover.

    I’ll be updating on this shortly, but it appears that the show will have MLB Players Association Executive Director Michael Weiner as one of the guests on the initial show… I’m in fantastic company.

    I really give it to Bloomberg to launching the show (and yes, I would have said this whether I was on the show, or not). It shows that sports business is becoming more and more of interest to the general public.

    Look for more on the show as I get updates from Bloomberg


    OTHER NEWS FROM THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS NETWORK

    (THE BIZ OF BASEBALL)


    Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

    Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

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    Posted in Baseball Insight, Broadcasting, Maury Talkin' Sports | Comments Off on Bloomberg Television, Sports Business, and Me

    Welcome to Sports Bash (MauryBrown.com)

    3rd November 2009

    If there’s one thing certain in life, it’s change. Sure, sports as business is fun (well, at least for some), and I don’t intend to stop doing it. But, how fun is it to just let loose and write columns?

    I’m about to find out.

    I’ve changed this blog to “Sports Bash” because the self-deprecating nature of “Maury Brown’s Biz of Sports” got well… boring. After all, there’s the Business of Sports Network sites to allow me to cover sports outside the lines, but that’s become almost pure reporting and analysis.

    So, Sports Bash will give me a chance to really let my columnist bend stretch, Let’s see where it goes.

    Posted in Maury Talkin' Sports | Comments Off on Welcome to Sports Bash (MauryBrown.com)

    Alyssa Milano Would Consider Owning a Minor League Team

    26th October 2009

    I’ve been doing interviews with those in sports business for a while now… Fay Vincent… Bob Costas… Marvin Miller… Kevin Pritchard… Each one has been fascinating in one way or another. But recently, I’ve bumped into the chance to interview a couple of individuals of celebrity status, and it’s been, well… fun.

    A couple of weeks ago I interviewed chef, restaurateur, and TV personality Emeril Lagasse in Las Vegas for the opening of his “Lagasse Stadium” space at The Palazzo, and today it’s actress, sports fan, and fashionista, Alyssa Milano.

    Three years ago, Milano approached MLB Properties about marketing a clothing line that would look as good in a boutique as it would at the merchandise stand at the ballpark. The results has spawned not only a revolution in clothing for women to wear to the ballpark, but the business model has been so successful that it is now available for the NFL, NBA, NHL, and NCAA. As Greg Sim, MLB Properties’ director of licensing, apparel and headwear said at the time Touch by Alyssa Milano was launched, it taps “a part of the market we haven’t touched yet, putting a high-end product on the casual and younger fans who are more fashion conscious.”

    One of the most notable comments… When I asked if she might wish to own a sports franchise, she answered, “I would love to buy into a Triple-A baseball team.”

    Some key quotes:

    • On how the idea for Touch came about – “I figured if just 30% of these women were insulted by the pink gear (like I was) but wore it anyway because it was the only way MLB was addressing female fans, the market was there for a well made, fashionable, flattering, fan apparel line.”
    • On reaching a deal with MLB Properties – “Ultimately, I don’t think they gave me the licensing because of the concept of the clothing line. I think they gave me the licensing because they could tell I was a real fan and that I could represent female fans in a passionate, intelligent way.”
    • On her attention to detail – I’m involved with every aspect of the line for the simple reason that I’m the one sitting in the stands, spanning all leagues, for over 80 games a year. I don’t think a designer sitting in an office can adequately design for a sports fan if they aren’t actually attending sporting events.
    • On being a female presence in the predominantly male world of sports – “I don’t even think about it that way. My intention is simply to give women a voice in sports. And I try to use whatever opportunity I’m given.”

    On interviews…

    The interview with Milano isn’t the only one in the hopper. We’re in the midst of transcribing an interview with MLB Network’s Victor Rojas. And, not content with that, look for an exhaustive interview with former BALCO head, Victor Conte.

    Other The Biz of Baseball content includes:

    But, it’s not just baseball we’re covering.

    Today sees a fantastic article/interview on The Biz of Basketball by Business of Sports Network staffer Matthew Coller with Brian Byrnes on the building of the Oklahoma City Thunder brand.


    Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is available for hire or freelance. Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

    Don’t forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

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    Posted in Baseball Insight, Football Insight, Hockey Insight, Maury Talkin' Sports | Comments Off on Alyssa Milano Would Consider Owning a Minor League Team

    Adding Twitter Functionality To All The “Biz” Sites

    9th August 2009

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    CONTACT:
    Maury Brown
    President, Business of Sports Network
    (Office) 503-892-5722
    Contact Maury Brown (Select name from dropdown)

    “BIZ” SITES GO SOCIAL NETWORKING WITH TWITTER

    SITES ADD ABILITY TO POST TO TWITTER DIRECTLY, EACH SITE NOW HAS TWITTER ACCOUNT

    The Business of Sports Network announced today that has made “going social” part of each of their award winning sites in two dynamic ways that will get you more info, more often by adding Twitter to all of the sites within the Network’s family, including The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Basketball, The Biz of Football, and The Biz of Hockey. The additions mean breaking news and information will be available to those using the popular social networking location.

    “Social networking is not just a fad, it has become a powerful tool for sports information as leagues, those that report on sports in the media, and professional athletes continue to break news via Twitter, “said Maury Brown, founder and president of the Business of Sports Network. “The addition of Twitter to the Business of Sports Network family of sites is something we are excited about as we look to continue to offer new ways of giving our readers the best information on the business of sports.”

    Each Biz Site Now on Twitter
    Getting even more great content from the Business of Sports Network now comes through individual accounts for each site on the popular social networking application, Twitter. Get breaking news, information from those that we follow. Follow the Business of Sports Network sites through the following locations:

    The Biz of Baseball on Twitter

    The Biz of Basketball on Twitter

    The Biz of Football on Twitter

    The Biz of Hockey on Twitter

    Post to Twitter Directly from the Biz Sites
    Looking to make each of the Business of Sports Network sites even more interactive, you can now post directly to Twitter from each of the “Biz” sites on any page, anytime. Each of the sites now comes with Tweetboard functionality that allows you to login to your account, and post by clicking on a tab provided across each page of the sites, expanding the Twitter interface.

    Look for updates 24/7/365 from the staff at the Business of Sports Network to the Twitter accounts, as well as updates from Maury Brown, founder and president of the Business of Sports Network.

    ABOUT THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS NETWORK:
    The Business of Sports Network is a series of resources dedicated to sports news outside the lines. The network includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball, The Biz of Hockey, and our portal, the Business of Sports Network. The focus of BSN is on providing coverage of breaking news events in sports as it happens, provide expert analysis, provide interviews with those that work in sports business, and provide data and documents to allow readers to see deep into the issues and news confronting sports today.

    All the sites across the Business of Sports Network provide the following:

    • Reporting on news, as it happens, at the major, minor, and collegiate levels.
    • Provide interviews with sports executives, or those in the media that cover sports.
    • Data and documents
    • Thought provoking original articles and commentary from the staff at the Business of Sports Network

    –30–


    OTHER NEWS ACROSS THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS NETWORK

    (THE BIZ OF BASEBALL)

    (THE BIZ OF BASKETBALL)

    (THE BIZ OF FOOTBALL)

    (THE BIZ OF HOCKEY)

    Posted in Baseball Insight, Football Insight, Hockey Insight, Maury Talkin' Sports | Comments Off on Adding Twitter Functionality To All The “Biz” Sites

    I Have a Case of the Twitters

    8th June 2009

    When it comes to running content day in and day out on sports, the biggest challenge is finding information, doing your analysis, and getting the piece(s) published in a timely manner.

    As most anyone will tell you, information is power, and in authoring content across the Business of Sports Network of sites, as well as freelancing, the biggest challenge is that first part: finding solid information.

    That used to be done in one exersise each and every day — the trudging through approx. 100 bookmarks, and doing a hefty bit of search engine work.

    But, recently, I have added the social networking tool Twitter to the arsenal, and have found it an invaluable tool.

    The thing is, I got more than that.

    I’m a social creature in an often times, non-social world. Having your eyes and hands strapped to a laptop for long periods can wear one out. Twitter allows one to get info, and do a bit of social dabbling. For me, that involves my interests in music (been playing guitar for what seems like forever now), and autism awareness due to my son Travis. Twitter bridges that gap.

    If you are interested in what’s happening with me on Twitter, take a peak at the widget below as it updates in realtime.


    OTHER NEWS ACROSS THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS NETWORK


    Maury Brown

    Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

    Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network

    TwitterFollow Maury Brown and  the Business of Sports Network on Twitter

    Posted in Auto Racing Insight, Baseball Insight, Broadcasting, Facilities, Football Insight, Golf Insight, Hockey Insight, Maury Talkin' Sports, Maury's World, Soccer Insight | Comments Off on I Have a Case of the Twitters

    MLS Expansion Points to Pacific NW Rivalry, League to Expand (Again), More News

    19th March 2009

    Major League Soccer must feel that there’s something in the water in the Pacific Northwest. Today will see Sounders FC make their debut in Seattle as they host the Red Bulls at Qwest Field with more than 32,000 fans expected. The game will come on the heels of Vancouver, BC being awarded one of two expansion franchises for the 2011 season, and Portland being awarded the second and final expansion club tomorrow at a 10a.m. PT press conference in what is lovingly referred to as Soccer City, USA (credit Timber fans at SoccerCityUSA.com for breaking the story). Heck, the Timbers already have MLS ticket sale info online for 2011. (NOTE: The Timbers have since pulled the info, SoccerCityUSA.com posted the details here before being yanked)

    With the Sounders, and eventually Vancouver (Whitecaps), and Portland (Timbers) coming into the league, it sets up a perfect “I-5 rivalry”, and certainly taps into the grassroots fan base that has been building in the region for years for soccer. There are funding issues to deal with on Portland’s end, but if they pull it off (which they should given the award tomorrow), Commissioner Garber should be given a thumbs-up for tapping into the region.

    The question now is, where will teams 19 and 20 play? Garber made mention at yesterday’s press conference that the league will (once again) be expanding by two clubs. Too fast? Maybe. Maybe, not. The one certain factor is that with all the expansion fees rolling into the league, MLS will have some extra green to offset the impacts of the recession.

    In other sports business news…

    The Miami City Commission voted 3-2 today in favor of a $639 million package to fund a new ballpark for the team that would be named the Miami Marlins after the Marlins made several concessions in an effort to get the funding passed. If Miami-Dade County Commissioners vote in favor of the funding package, the Marlins will have finally landed the long sought after baseball-only stadium that three separate Marlins ownership groups have been pining for for more than a decade..

    Seems the completed sale of the Cubs won’t be occurring by the beginning of the 2009 MLB season. “I think it will be a challenge to make opening day. If I were to tell you we were going to make opening day, everything would have to fall into place just perfectly, and the world’s an imperfect place, so I would say that’s probably unlikely,” said Cubs chairman Crane Kenney from Mesa yesterday.

    And there was much dancing in the streets… Gameday Audio is coming to MLB.com’s At Bat application for iPhone.

    The NFL player reps are smart to have gone with an outsider to replace Gene Upshaw.

    President Obama gets ready for March Madness by filling out a bracket for ESPN.

    This just in, working for Lenny Dyskstra is the new Hell’s Kitchen.

    This just in, A-Rod needs to work on his image.

    In the cha-ching department, I’ve come up with a new metric designed to calculate the average amount a club that hosts a postseason game in MLB pulls in.

    While US fans snore through the event, for the most part, the rest of the world is making the World Baseball Classic an attendance and ratings hit.

    It is about the money, stupid, has an excellent interview with Jeff Pearlman, author of The Rocket Who Fell to Earth.

    Here’s what 10 years worth of end of year payroll looks like for Major League Baseball. Surprise, the Yankees outspent all comers.

    The NHL really has its act together when it comes to digital media as witnessed by this.

    In other NHL news, the players could ostensibly be working the last 12-13 games of the season unpaid.

    And finally, “That was a wicked googlie!” Manny Ramirez tries Cricket as part of a promo for DirecTV.


    Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

    Posted in Baseball Insight, Broadcasting, Facilities, Football Insight, Hockey Insight, Maury Talkin' Sports, Soccer Insight | Comments Off on MLS Expansion Points to Pacific NW Rivalry, League to Expand (Again), More News

    Thursday Late Night News: Sports Marketing as the Recession’s New Whipping Boy, Manny Contract, More

    5th March 2009

    Today turns into tonight before I can get to the personal blog. Hey, you have to have some time to research articles, right?

    The focus early on Thursday centered around how sports marketing it taking a licking due to the economy, especially those banking giants that are set to receive TARP money from the federal government to bail them out.

    Business of Sports Network staff writer Pete Toms does an extensive (and I mean extensive) article entitled Sports Marketing is the Recession’s New Whipping Boy, while over at the Business of Sports Network, I add some Nielsen Media Research data on how banks are spending TV ad budgets on sports. Found that to be really surprising, so take a peak at the link.

    The other thing that I hit on today was the Manny Ramirez contract. Maybe it was the constant onslaught of coverage, but when the whole deal started to hinge on the amount of money being deferred, a couple of teeth got knocked off my sprocket. I go into why there’s some level of insanity in the Dodgers of all teams deferring salary and placing Manny’s salary on the books well after he’ll be out of Dodger Blue. I provide a table from Forbes showing the revenues the Dodgers have pulled in and their overall valuation ranking over the last five years. Let’s just say the number “4” is popular. Here’s a whole bunch of stats on Man-Ram.

    In other news…

    Will Manny get his asking price for his condo?

    The New York Jets are asking some employees to take two-weeks of unpaid leave in lieu of job cuts.

    Liberty Sports Group today announced that the company has transitioned its three regional sports networks to broadcast full-time in high definition. That includes FSN Northwest, FSN Pittsburgh, FSN Rocky Mountain (and sub-region FSN Utah).

    The Nationals are offering up more tickets to the Elton John, Billy Joel concert at Nationals Park due to a computer glitch when tickets initially went on sale.

    The NHL really had the trade deadline covered from all angles.

    Some guy named A-Rod had puss drained today.

    T.O. is now officially unemployed.

    Sad news for baseball fans as Jon Weisman reports that Diamond Leung has been laid-off by the Press-Enterprise.

    Getting a home for the Masters Tournament has gotten cheaper due to the economy.

    And finally, former New York Times baseball reporting icon Murray Chass appears to have gone complete off the deep end regarding Mike Piazza and his (wretch) back acne.


    Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown’s full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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